How-to articles about programming embedded systems in C++.

Top 10 Bug-Killing Coding Standard Rules

To increase security and keep bugs out of medical devices and other safety-critical embedded systems, add these 10 bug-killing rules to your embedded C coding standard.

The Perils of Preemptive Multitasking

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Every commercial RTOS employs a priority-based preemptive scheduler. This despite the fact that real-time systems vary in their requirements and real-time scheduling doesn't have to be so uniform. Multitasking and meeting deadlines is certainly not a one-size-fits-all problem.

Add-Ons for Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs)

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Should you integrate a GUI into an embedded system by adding a dedicated processor or upgrading the existing one? Here are some options and trade-offs.

How to Detect Memory Leaks

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Memory leaks can be particularly risky for long-running embedded systems. Here are some tools to identify, track, and analyze memory leaks in embedded C and C++ programs.

How Endianness Works: Big-Endian vs. Little Endian

Some human languages are read and written from left to right; others from right to left. A similar issue arises in the field of computers, involving the representation of numbers.

How to Define Your Own assert() Macro for Embedded Systems

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Embedded systems programmers often value the assert() macro. This article explores the underlying definition of this handy macro, to show you how to roll your own.

How and When to Use C's assert() Macro

The assert() macro is one of those simple tools that would not seem to merit an entire article, but I have come across an alarming number of engineers who have not heard of it or do not use it.

CRC Series, Part 3: CRC Implementation Code in C/C++

CRCs are among the best checksums available to detect and/or correct errors in communications transmissions. This article shows how to implement an efficient CRC in C or C++.

How to Create Jump Tables via Function Pointer Arrays in C and C++

Jump tables, also called branch tables, are an efficient means of handling similar events in software. Here's a look at the use of arrays of function pointers in C/C++ as jump tables.

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